Monday, October 27, 2014

Can image buyers pay less while artists earn more?


The answer is yes! Marketing departments, agencies, editors, art buyers, art directors and designers can all benefit from working directly with the artist.

The traditional route for an image buyer to find an image has been to go to a stock library or commission a photographer.

My top tip is to source and buy images direct from the artist. You will be able to negotiate a better deal than with a stock library and the artist will also be better off because they will not be giving up 50, 60 or even 80% of the selling price as commission to the stock library. The artist can afford to sell their work more cheaply than a stock library and still end up with more money in their pocket.

By dealing directly with the artist image buyers can licence an image under favourable terms, ensure competitors will not have the same image and perhaps even negotiate exclusivity. You will have direct access to authentic and original work.

There really are no barriers anymore for art buyers wanting to deal directly with artists.

How image buyers can gain the advantage:


  • Buy direct from the artist to save on budgets and reward the creators more fairly for their work
  • Use social media sites like Flickr to easily find the images you’re looking for from a vast, global pool of creative artists 
  • Online ecommerce and file transfer sites make transactions easy and secure, worldwide
  • Build a your own library of contacts and artists that you can rely on when working to tight deadlines
  • And last but not least: the pleasure of dealing with the artist directly, the creator.

So my plea to art buyers is: please consider buying direct from the artist.

If anyone reading this has any other tips for artists or art buyers I’d love to hear them. Feel free to join in the conversation.

Till soon,

Paul

www.indigo2photography.co.uk (we’re always happy to talk to art buyers looking for something specific)

Sunday, October 12, 2014

Proof: Lynn Johnson on the Heroic Nature of Humanity

Photojournalist and National Geographic photographer Lynn Johnson shares her views on her work and what motivates her.

She is the recipient of awards including four World Press Photography Awards, seven Golden Quills for Photojournalism, the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award and Picture of the Year Award from the National Press Photographer Association.

For me her work really stands out because of the way she connects the viewer, in a direct and visceral way with the people that she photographs. Her images are elegant and beautiful but more importantly they give a voice to the people she photographs, helping them to tell their story.

Till soon,

Paul

www.indigo2photography.co.uk

Monday, October 06, 2014

Proof: Ed Kashi on the Greatest Work You'll Do

Being a photojournalist is challenging and difficult at times.

Emotionally it can also be a roller coaster. One day you're in harms way and the next you're sitting back at home in your normal environment. How do you reconcile the two worlds and what drives photojournalists to produce their best work. Ed Kashi puts it better than I could in the video below.




Hope you enjoyed that as much as did. Ed hits the nail on the head.

Back again soon.

Till then...

Paul
www.indigo2photography.co.uk

Saturday, August 09, 2014

A new venture

Well I've embarked on a new venture to sell prints of my work. Below is an embedded slide show generated from the content of my new website. There's plenty more to see and new work is added daily.

Fine  art prints are available on paper, canvas, metal and acrylic, and greeting cards, you can even get a custom iPhone case. So feel free to go crazy.

I'd very much value your feedback on the images, the website and experience of buying work. Naturally I hope you see something you'd like in your living room or as present for a special someone.

Art Prints

Thanks for taking a look.

Paul
http://paul-indigo.artistwebsites.com/

Sunday, July 20, 2014

Respect your pixels


Daily I see so many images that have been ruined by heavy handed manipulation. The thing that really makes me sad is when I see a great image, lots of emotion, good light and a powerful composition that has been destroyed by poor editing.

I prefer to subtly enhance an image but keep it real. The example above shows a RAW file out of my camera (Before) and the (After) image following a few minutes of work. It's about gentle touches.

Great images are just like calamari. If you overcook them, they become very tough to get through and unpalatable.

My plea: respect your pixels.

Till soon,
Paul
www.indigo2photography.co.uk

Saturday, July 12, 2014

7 Photojournalism Tips by Reuters Photographer Damir Sagolj





Great video. There's really not much I can add. Excellent advice. Watch, enjoy and learn.


"What are the key tips to shooting great news photography? This video by award-winning Reuters photographer Damir Sagolj, compiled by the Thomson Reuters Foundation, share his seven ideas on how to shoot news photos that engage audiences and tell a great story. More on www.trust.org"

Creative director: Claudine Boeglin
Producer: Amelia Wong
Designer: by Ye Li

Till soon,

Paul

www.indigo2photography.co.uk

Sunday, July 06, 2014

Freedom to use natural light

Ed Kashi stands out as a photojournalist who has an extraordinary ability to empathise with the people in his stories.

He eloquently explains, in the video below, how modern digital cameras have enabled him to work with natural light, removing many of the technical constraints that stood in the way of capturing meaningful images.

The more photographers fiddle with gear the less able they are to build a rapport with their subjects and discover the visual possibilities in a scene.

The interview is crammed with good advice. Hope you enjoy it as much as I did.



The key for a photographer is knowing when to use extra lighting like flash and when to grab the moment. There is no formula. The guiding principle has to be to continually ask the question, "how do I capture the visual essence of the story?" Don't just look. Really see. Strip away everything that is not essential, everything that gets in the way and be concise and clear.

Till soon,
Paul
www.indigo2photography.co.uk