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Bananas and Crossings

 


A man crosses the street with a bag full of bananas. I enjoy photographing at pedestrian crossings because they offer a rich tapestry of urban life and human emotion. The diverse range of people and their interactions provide an endless stream of stories and moments to capture. The striking patterns of the crossings themselves, along with the urban architecture, create a compelling backdrop. 

I'm drawn to the candidness and dynamism of subjects in motion, capturing them against the interplay of light, shadow, and colour. These scenes are visually appealing and symbolise life's myriad choices and transitions. To me, pedestrian crossings are more than just parts of the city; they're a canvas where the rhythm and character of urban life are vividly and artistically expressed.

Thanks for reading.

Paul

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