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Important notice

The notice on the ferry said that passengers were forbidden from throwing ‘anything’ overboard. I rarely manipulate images, but I couldn’t resist a spot of fun in Photoshop.

However, there’s also something else that I want to communicate. It’s easy to manipulate images and video. We should question everything we see and hear because dark forces are at work. People are using social media to shape public opinion. Check every story with at least two sources. Include sources with a proven record of journalistic integrity.

Photographers also need to be more transparent about image manipulation (beyond the typical image enhancements). I think photographers should tell people if they have manipulated their images.

Till soon,

Paul

Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/paul.indigo

The three questions professional photographers ask

As photographers, we walk around seeing the world in a different way to other people. Something catches our eye and triggers our interest. We decide to lift our cameras and take a shot. A photographer with a professional approach will ask themselves several questions before lifting their camera.

Three key questions I always ask myself are:
What specifically in the scene caught my eye?Is it really worth photographing?How can I make a stronger image to communicate what’s important to me?  There are, of course, many other questions you ask as you make a series of decisions which lead to the final image. You work the scene. You think about how the light will change, different angles and perspectives and you keep going until you’ve revealed the essence of what you want to communicate. Once you have the first shot, you look for ways to make an even better image. You keep going through this process until you’re sure you’ve got it.

Curiosity and self-critical dissatisfaction are vital drive…

What I learnt again about photography from Sarrusi’s hat

I approached him on the market at his stall because his hat caught my eye. I’m sure you can see why. At first, Sarrusi was not keen on being photographed. But we chatted. Eventually, he agreed after a bit of banter. The first portraits were quite austere and serious, and then he cracked and I got his lovely engaging smile.

Patience, kindness and understanding are things every photographer should pack, along with lenses and cameras.

Till soon,
Paul
www.indigo2photography.com

What's the difference between snapping and composing

What is the difference between a random snap and a careful photographic composition?

The answer may not appear obvious at a glance. Uncovering the joy of carefully crafted photography requires effort. The viewer must engage with the image. Sadly, too often in our hyper-speed online and social media world, images are swiped past in a split second.

The carefully crafted image loses out but so does the viewer, missing the joyful discoveries that await someone who takes the time to really read an image. Today, image consumption is akin to flying over the grand canyon in a jet at the speed of sound. If you really want to enjoy the view you've got to sit on the canyon rim for an hour and watch the sun go down.

I'll try to illustrate why 81 Bo Kaap is not a random snap. The first reason is something the viewer will not know. The photographer, me in this case, pre-visualised the image. I didn't just lift the camera and press the shutter button. Walking toward these ladies I saw the …

How do you make a good photographic portrait?

How do you make a good photographic portrait? The answer is both simple and complex at the same time. The simple essence will probably surprise you.



If I had to write a book about it then I'd cover all the usual topics. Lighting, composition, choosing the right lens, using depth of field and thinking about the background and how you use colour and tone. All have a role to play.

We could also discuss the softer side. How you build rapport with your subject. And how to collaborate.

The truth is none of the above things really matter when it comes down to the essence of what makes a good portrait. Don't get me wrong. They all contribute as stepping stones. They add finesse and enhance. They improve the aesthetics and make it easier to take a good photograph. Other photographers may admire your technique. But good technique does not make a good portrait. Certainly not in the eyes of of the wider public.

So, what does make a good portrait. Simple. The expression on the face, in the…

Art of the decisive moment

Capturing the decisive moment requires patience and timing. Good timing depends on your ability to anticipate the right moment.


Welcome to my relaunched blog. You'll notice a new design to mark the moment. What do you think?

The plan is to write far more regularly. Short posts. Easy to read. Focused on a single subject.

This time it's about that vital element. The anticipation of the decisive moment.

As a scene unfolds you're thinking about what is going to happen next. Where are people moving to? What are they doing? What's happening in the background? Do you have the right point of view or do you need to move?

To be ready for the moment you need a prepared mind and a prepared camera. I almost never use burst mode. It's too inaccurate. While the shutter is clattering away you're not seeing what is about to happen. You run the risk that the exact split second you should have snapped is between frames. I prefer the approach of taking a single shot, relying on t…